Greek Gods and Goddesses


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As many Greeks would say, the gods and goddesses did not create the Universe, the Universe created the gods. Heaven and Earth were the first "parents" the Titans were their children and the Olympians were their grandchildren. Cronus was the most important of the Titans, but the Olympians over took the power with Zeus as the leader. Zeus then became the most powerful of the Olympians.[1]
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The name of the Olympians came from Olympus, which was where the gods lived. It is unsure of what Olympus was, but Mt. Olympus was in Thessaly, northeast Greece. On the other hand, in some greek works, Olympus is not considered a mountain. It does not matter where or what Olympus was, all that we need to know is the purpose that it served. The entrance was known as a great gate of clouds kept by the seasons. Olympus was where all of the gods would live, and in some ways they would portray characteristics of human beings.
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In many ways the gods were just like humans. They came into the world like humans, the grew up like humans as well. They would marry, have children and be a family, which is very similar to what humans have done throughout history. There were many aspects of life that the gods would feel very strongly about, and very similarly to humans, they were in no shape or form perfect. They had many weaknesses, which could cause some controversy to both the gods and humans. The gods would have to own up to their actions, whether bad or good.[2]

The Olympians were made up of several different gods. In greek myths, it is said to be twelve gods which made up the divine family. It all started with Zeus, who the chief, then his siblings, his two brothers Poseidon and Hades and his sister Hestia. From there we have his wife Hera and their son Ares. The others were Athena, Apollo, Aphrodite, Hermes, Artemis, Hephaestus, Dionysus, and Demeter. It is sometimes said that there were only twelve Olympians at one time, but overall there were more than twelve.[3]
  1. ^
    Hamilton, Edith. Mythology. New York, New York: Grand Central, 1999. Print.
  2. ^
    Hamilton, Edith. Mythology. New York, New York: Grand Central, 1999. Print.
  3. ^
    Hamilton, Edith. Mythology. New York, New York: Grand Central, 1999. Print.